What is DevOps? | DevOps Introduction

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What is DevOps?DevOps Training

Today, software delivery in IT firms is suffering from a lack of cross-departmental integration. Problems are increasingly getting “lobbed over the wall” across teams, and as a result, production is suffering. So, as a developer, do you find yourself waiting for weeks before your work gets in-line for production? Is delay in deploying products creating an unhealthy pressure on you to outpace competitors?

We also understand that it is a challenge for developers who often need to balance pending codes on one hand and develop new ones on the other hand. Also, errors or problems crop up whenever a new code is pushed into the production environment. This happens as the production environment is often not identical to the development environment for which the code is originally developed for.

Now, let us look at some of the challenges faced by the operations team.

As a systems administrator, you are responsible for maintaining the uptime of the production environment with an added challenge of maintaining a code deployment schedule that is expected to accommodate any kinds of delays that are relayed from the development team.

Add to this, with an ever growing range of products and services that lead to a rise in the customer-base, you find yourself administrating an ever increasing number of servers too. Besides, the operations team also finds itself fixing errors once the code is deployed. Such a discord between the development and operations team is commonplace in a majority of organizations today.
This is where the bold new practice of DevOps comes in. This movement was born in 2009 as a way to break through the silos and inflexibility resulting from the existing practices in the IT industry.

DevOps inherits from the Agile System Administration movement and the Enterprise Systems Management (ESM). The movement works to increase collaboration between teams that can ultimately lead to better productivity, profitability, and happy customers.DevOps teams do this by automating the process of software delivery and infrastructural changes.

Automation is carried out for everything: testing, workflows, and infrastructure. And is done in small intervals against writing large chunks of code and testing it all together.
Besides, the practice has led to the building of identical development and production environments based on the same configurations.

DevOps uses toolchains, or a set of multiple tools, to aid in the delivery, development, and management of applications throughout the development lifecycle of a software. This helps teams code, build, test, package, release, configure and monitor better in an iterative manner. To do this, configuration management codes are developed that describe how software packages, operating systems, etcetera, should be written. A DevOps team also uses a source control system that helps track and record changes made to all kinds of code being developed.

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What is DevOps?DevOps Training

Worried about projects that run late and end up underperforming?

Not quite confident how the new software or features developed will perform in a live environment? Relax, you are not alone.

Today, software delivery in IT firms is suffering from a lack of cross-departmental integration. Problems are increasingly getting “lobbed over the wall” across teams, and as a result, production is suffering.

So, as a developer, do you find yourself waiting for weeks before your work gets in-line for production? Is delay in deploying products creating an unhealthy pressure on you to outpace competitors?

We also understand that it is a challenge for developers who often need to balance pending codes on one hand and develop new ones on the other hand.

Also, errors or problems crop up whenever a new code is pushed into the production environment.

This happens as the production environment is often not identical to the development environment for which the code is originally developed for.

Now, let us look at some of the challenges faced by the operations team.

As a systems administrator, you are responsible for maintaining the uptime of the production environment with an added challenge of maintaining a code deployment schedule that is expected to accommodate any kinds of delays that are relayed from the development team.

Add to this, with an ever growing range of products and services that lead to a rise in the customer-base, you find yourself administrating an ever increasing number of servers too.

Besides, the operations team also finds itself fixing errors once the code is deployed.

Such a discord between the development and operations team is commonplace in a majority of organizations today.

This is where the bold new practice of DevOps comes in. This movement was born in 2009 as a way to break through the silos and inflexibility resulting from the existing practices in the IT industry.

DevOps inherits from the Agile System Administration movement and the Enterprise Systems Management (ESM)

The movement works to increase collaboration between teams that can ultimately lead to better productivity, profitability, and happy customers.

DevOps teams do this by automating the process of software delivery and infrastructural changes.

Automation is carried out for everything: testing, workflows, and infrastructure. And is done in small intervals against writing large chunks of code and testing it all together.

Besides, the practice has led to the building of identical development and production environments based on the same configurations.

DevOps uses toolchains, or a set of multiple tools, to aid in the delivery, development, and management of applications throughout the development lifecycle of a software.

This helps teams code, build, test, package, release, configure and monitor better in an iterative manner.

To do this, configuration management codes are developed that describe how software packages, operating systems, etcetera, should be written.

A DevOps team also uses a source control system that helps track and record changes made to all kinds of code being developed.

This helps any organization optimize and monitor in real time and ultimately deliver great software.

The DevOps movement is still in its infancy but has been gathering pace. Now, organizations deploy code 30 times more frequently with 60 times fewer failures.

Besides, an adaptation of the DevOps practices in the IT industry increased from 66% in 2015 to 74% in 2016!

According to CV-library, the number of DevOps Engineers vacancies skyrocketed in 2016, increasing 144 per cent over the previous 12 months!

According to Glassdoor, DevOps Engineers are earning $113,500 per year!

We also help you prepare for the DevOps Foundation Certification examination. And what’s more, you can learn with us in two ways, by either signing up for a mentor-led live online program or a classroom training program.

In this course, you will get:

• 4 online mentoring sessions spanning across 2 weeks with 4 hours per session

• Or, 2 offline mentoring sessions spanning across 1 weeks with 8 hours per session

• Interactive classes with 20–25 students

• DevOps practitioners as mentors

• Access to free reference material

• Globally accessible certification from DevOps Institute, USA.

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